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Drag Race Holland Has Failed Their Non-Binary Queens

By : October 21, 2020 No Comment
Growing up, I always felt like an outcast. I was always labeled as a tomboy. I hated the color pink. I still think that jumping rope is one of the stupidest activities that people do. I never felt like I found my place. When you're born and raised in San Francisco, you see a little bit of everything. Whether it was with friends or family, I would spot a drag queen on more than one occasion. When I was with family, the reactions range from grumblings under their breath to a simple head shake. When I was with friends, it was always that long quiet stare until you pass them, at which point everyone would burst out in laughter and make comments. Not wanting to stand out even more than
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Dealing With the Anxiety-Inducing Experience That Is College

By : October 4, 2020 Comments Off
Before I moved into college, I had a completely different piece in mind (even just saying the word “piece” makes me feel professional but, I am very much not so). I wanted to write about LGBT+ representation in animation, which I still want to do, but I am feeling quiet sidetracked at the moment. So yeah, almost three weeks ago I moved into college. College, especially during this time of living in a pandemic, is a strange place. As a freshman, there’s this great task put on your shoulders of having to find how you fit into the vast community. On top of that, you have to figure out where to go all the time (which I am terrible at). Once move-in starts, there’s pretty much this scramble to meet
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Francine’s “Partner” Experience

By : September 9, 2020 Comments Off
As of my senior year, I’ve been with my current partner, so almost four years. I call him my partner because I’m bisexual, and one of my preferences regarding pronouns is using terms such as “partner” instead of boyfriend, or fiancé, or husband. If I were dating a woman, she would be my partner, too. For me, this is deeper than inclusion: it’s a safety net. To understand why this is important to me, I have to recollect on my experiences in high school and middle school. I never came out, I had always had relationships with both women and men, and everyone who knew me knew that gender was not one of my preferences. It was a strange, unceremonial event: one day I started dating my best friend, and
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Staying Sober During Shelter-in-Place

By : September 9, 2020 Comments Off
In March of 2015, I quit drinking. This came after a (literal) dry run of staying sober for all of the year prior, thinking I had finally gotten my drinking under control, and realizing that I did not. It took me three months to realize that if I kept drinking the way that I was - predominantly bingeing on shots and wine - I would not make it to 25. My mental health was all over the place, and I noticed that my prescribed antidepressants weren’t working the way they should. This, I realized later, was because I was rapid cycling, a term used to describe when someone experiences four or more episodes of hypomania, mania, or depression in a 12-month period. I was once again self-medicating with alcohol for
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Want a Job? Be Gayer!

By : September 9, 2020 Comments Off
Want a Job? Be Gayer! We all know that the American job economy is trying to claw its way out of the unemployment dip. Many people (including myself) are on the lookout for a return to reality, and a steady paycheck. In general, LGBTQ+ people tend to face higher unemployment rates. But this past June, the U.S. Supreme Court's decision decided that businesses cannot terminate an employee’s position based on their sexual or gender identity. So I think, as a result, it’s now going to be the new woke-trend for a company to hire LGBTQ+ people. Organizations will be looking for more Queer approval than Bud Light when they came out with a rainbow bottle and a hard seltzer.  Straight people: you want that job? Sorry, but being yourself is
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LGBTQ Youth and Mental Health

By : September 3, 2020 Comments Off
A lot of LGBTQ people experience uncomfortability at the doctor's office or hospital. I know for myself it was difficult to have conversations with medical professionals. The questions they asked me as a teen often assumed heterosexuality. They asked if I was sexually active, and if I respond yes then the immediate follow-up information given was about pregnancy or condom use (in reference to the male anatomy), which frankly was not an issue for my sixteen-year-old queer self. This developed into a hesitation to see medical professionals and though I am over that now because I met doctors who are extremely educated on LGBTQ topics, it can be detrimental to people if they do not feel welcome in a medical space. The LGBTQ community are highly susceptible to mental health
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